pop my mind

Disintegration

A response on Pop My Mind, for the Fragmentation theme. This one is a self-portrait, exploring the divide, bleed and crossover of artist and artwork, and the blurry edges where you end and your work begins.

A fun experiment, with a gratuitous application of black face paint.

Noveau Divine

noveau-divine

We are beyond the new rich now, the world is home to the new divine, with wealth enough to make themselves gods.

A response on Pop My Mind the theme of Opulence. One of the largest pieces I have ever made, and appropriately enough, is inspiring me to continue to work bigger and grander.

Bodies in Chaos

bodies-in-chaos

Dance is a chaos of bodies in motion.

A response on Pop My Mind to Double Bill, a dance piece. This piece was part of Pop My Minds Motion exhibition at the Whistler Gallery.

Available as a print at Society6, INPRNT and Design By Humans

Aha!

aha

A response on Pop My Mind. Articulating the moment when ideas hit, that creative explosion in the mind that is the best thing about making art.

Available as a print on Society6, INPRNT and Design By Humans

Pop My Mind First Birthday Exhibition

Last year, after I graduated, I was approached by someone to become part of a new, online creative platform that was, essentially, artistic chinese whispers.

This year I had the amazing opportunity to be a part of that platforms first birthday exhibition, and it was a wonderful experience. Two of my own works were on display among many other fantastic works, and I also took part in my first ever live art performance. In collaboration with James Todino, we made improvised music and art together, with both of us responding to the others creations in real time.

Photo credit: Karis Lambert

Photo credit: Karis Lambert

I have never performed with my art before, the closest thing being a Skype collaboration I did – also with Pop My Mind, and another great experience – so I was pretty nervous. But once it got going it was an incredible thing, vaguely sensing people watching around me, while trying to get into my creative headspace enough to make work fast. The speed was another tricky aspect, as anyone who follows this blog will know. I like to work more slowly and methodically usually, researching and planning before I put brush to paper. So doing this was a liberating experience, to see what I could make with my usual self-imposed restrictions removed.

I have to say despite my nerves and the stress of getting back home – missed the train I wanted by a minute and ended up with a 3-hour long train ride home through London in the middle of the night. Not fun! – I’m really glad I pushed myself and went for this experience. It’s the kind of thing you regret not doing, more than you’re afraid of doing it.

To all the people involved in the exhibition, both in setting it up and participating, a big congratulations to you all, and thank you for letting me be involved in this amazing creative experience.